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Latin Legend Ray Barretto Awarded NEA Jazz Fellowship
Published October 16, 2005

Said Barretto, "To receive this honor is the gift of a lifetime. Jazz has been my spiritual babysitter since my youth in Harlem and the Bronx, and I've spent my career trying to give something back."

Latin music legend Ray Barretto has been named an NEA (National Endowment of Arts) Jazz Master, a significant award which he will accept at the annual NEA gala held to kickoff the IAJE jazz conference.  This year IAJE will take place in NYC in January 2006.

The National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Masters Fellowships are the highest honors that our government bestows upon jazz musicians. These fellowships are given in recognition that this magnificent art form, so profoundly based in American culture, is one of America's greatest gifts to the world.

Said Barretto, "To receive this honor is the gift of a lifetime. Jazz has been my spiritual babysitter since my youth in Harlem and the Bronx, and I've spent my career trying to give something back. With gratitude and respect to everyone at the National Endowment for the Arts, please allow me to consider myself, still, a jazz student."

Bio

The most widely recorded conguero in jazz, Ray Barretto was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1929 and grew up listening to the music of Puerto Rico and the swing bands of Duke Ellington, Count Basie (JM), and Benny Goodman. Barretto credits Dizzy Gillespie's (JM) recording of "Manteca," featuring conguero Chano Pozo, with his decision to become a professional musician.

He first sat in on jam sessions at the Orlando, a GI jazz club in Munich. In 1949, after military service, he returned to Harlem and taught himself to play the drums, getting his first regular job with Eddie Bonnemere's Latin Jazz Combo. Barretto then played for four years with Cuban bandleader/pianist José Curbelo. In 1957, he replaced Mongo Santamaria in Tito Puente's band, with which he recorded his first album, Dance Mania. After four years with Puente, he was one of the most sought-after percussionists in New York, attending jam sessions with artists including Max Roach (JM) and Art Blakey (JM) and recording with Sonny Stitt, Lou Donaldson, Red Garland, Gene Ammons, Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, Cannonball Adderley, Freddie Hubbard (JM), Cal Tjader, and Dizzy Gillespie. Barretto was so much in demand that in 1960, he was a house musician for the Prestige, Blue Note, and Riverside record labels.

Barretto's first job as a bandleader came in 1961, when Riverside producer Orrin Keepnews asked him to form a charanga for a recording, Pachanga With Barretto. His next album, Charanga Moderna, featured "El Watusi," which became the first Latin number to penetrate Billboard's Top-20s chart. In 1963, "El Watusi" went gold. In 1975 and 1976, Barretto earned back-to-back Grammy nominations for his albums Barretto (with the prize-winning hit "Guarere") and Barretto Live...Tomorrow. His 1979 album for Fania, Ricanstruction, considered a classic of salsa, was named Best Album (1980) by Latin N.Y. magazine, and Barretto was named Conga Player of the Year. He won a Grammy in 1990 for the song "Ritmo en el Corazon" with Celia Cruz. In 2003, he released the critically acclaimed CD Hommage to Art Blakey on the Sunnyside label.

Ray Barretto was inducted into the International Latin Music Hall of Fame in 1999. He was voted Jazz Percussionist of 2004 by the Jazz Journalists Association and won the Down Beat critics poll for percussion in 2005.