Reggae & Caribbean    YELLOWMAN    World Music at Global Rhythm - The Destination for World Music


Reggae & Caribbean    YELLOWMAN    World Music at Global Rhythm - The Destination for World Music
Moroccan Sahara

Search

WORLD MUSIC NEWS
WorldMusicFeatures
WORLD MUSIC Profiles
  Artist Features
  World Music Legends
  Reggae Legends
  African Legends
Live Music Events
  World Music Concerts
  World Music Festivals
  World Music Clubs
Global Lifestile
  Travel
  Food
  Film
reviews
  Books
  DVD
  Live Music
WorldMusicFeatures
WORLD MUSIC CD ReVIEW
  Africa
  Asia & Far East
  Australia & Oceania
  Celtic & Irish
  Electronica
  Europe
  Greater Latin America
  Jazz
  Middle East & North Africa
  New Age & Avant Garde
  North American
  Reggae & Caribbean
  South Asia
  World Fusion
WORLD MUSIC links
back issues
 

Deutsch
Franais
Espa ol
Italiano
Portuguese
Japanese
Chinese





World Music CD Reviews Reggae & Caribbean

Print Page
E-mail to Friend E-mail to Editor
Yellowman
Nobody Move Nobody Get Hurt
Greensleeves Reggae Classics

EEK-A-MOUSE
Mouseketeer
Greensleeves Reggae Classics

By Tom Pryor

Published January 20, 2006

Back in the early ’80s, dancehall reggae was on the ascendant and there was still plenty of room for the outsized personalities that made the genre so irresistible in its heyday. Two of the most flamboyant personalities ever to rock the dancehall were Yellowman and Eek-A-Mouse, two very different performers who were united by the unstoppable production of Henry “Junjo” Lawes and Channel One Studio’s legendary house band, the Roots Radics. Both DJs get their due as Greensleeves Reggae Classics reissues two of their classic albums. Yellowman (a.k.a. Winston Foster) surely needs no introduction, since his domination of the dancehall in the early ’80s was total, generating hit after hit and making him perhaps the second best-known Jamaican export after Bob Marley. Though primarily a singles artist, 1984’s Nobody Move Nobody Get Hurt was a lewd, cocky and hilarious ghetto communiqué that showcased a masterful lyrical flow; “Body Move” and the title track still sound fresh today. In contrast, Eek-A-Mouse (a.k.a. Ripton Hilton) played up the comedy side of dancehall, prancing the stage in an array of outrageous costumes while singlehandedly pioneering the “singjay” style that rules the dancehall today. 1984’s Mouseketeer caught him at the height of his fame, three years after he’d already taken the island by storm with hits like “Virgin Girl” and “Wa Do Dem.” Despite this, such lesser hits as “Star, Daily News Or Gleaner” and “How I Got Me Name” still manage to pack a punch.

RSS Feeds

ADVERTISING LINKS

Arc128
Quincy Jones Eagle Rock
Lawson Sideblock
Globe Trekker 120 150
emusicsideblock

GoNomad
Roland

Contact us | Press Room | Contests | About Global Rhythm magazine | Advertise / Media Kit
Privacy Statement | Terms of Use
| Global Rhythm Contributors | Link to Us | Back Issues

Copyright © 2008 Zenbu Media. All rights reserved.

Powered by Ecomsolutions.net