North American    TAJ MAJAL & THE HULA BLUES    World Music at Global Rhythm - The Destination for World Music


North American    TAJ MAJAL & THE HULA BLUES    World Music at Global Rhythm - The Destination for World Music
nancymitchell

Search

WORLD MUSIC NEWS
WorldMusicFeatures
WORLD MUSIC Profiles
  Artist Features
  World Music Legends
  Reggae Legends
  African Legends
Live Music Events
  World Music Concerts
  World Music Festivals
  World Music Clubs
Global Lifestile
  Travel
  Food
  Film
reviews
  Books
  DVD
  Live Music
WorldMusicFeatures
WORLD MUSIC CD ReVIEW
  Africa
  Asia & Far East
  Australia & Oceania
  Celtic & Irish
  Electronica
  Europe
  Greater Latin America
  Jazz
  Middle East & North Africa
  New Age & Avant Garde
  North American
  Reggae & Caribbean
  South Asia
  World Fusion
WORLD MUSIC links
back issues
 

Deutsch
Franais
Espa ol
Italiano
Portuguese
Japanese
Chinese





World Music CD Reviews North American

Print Page
E-mail to Friend E-mail to Editor
Taj Majal & The Hula Blues
Hanapepe Dream
Tone-Cool/KANDU Records

By MICHAEL STONE

Published May 30, 2006

Hanapepe Dream, Taj Majal's second recording with the Hula Blues and first Tone-Cool release, marks the ensemble's inaugural U.S. tour. A longtime Hawaii resident and tireless proponent of world musical fusion, Taj proffers a unique meld of Hawaiian slack-key guitar und ukulele, African-Caribbean folk and the down-home blues that comprise his stock in trade. Hanapepe Dream confirms both his remarkable range and an omnivorous taste for global roots music. Consider the wry "King Edward's Throne," a minor-key calypso on the vagaries of love in high places; "Great Big Boat," a folksy Caribbean ditty; a hula-inflected "Livin' on Easy"; the gravelly vocal delivery of "Baby, You're My Destiny"; a Crescent City read of "Stagger Lee"; a menacing, saxophone-punctuated execution of Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower"; a laid-back ukulele- and clarinet-backed interpretation of "My Creole Belle" (Mississippi John Hurt is smiling somewhere); the reggae-tinge of "Black Jack Davy" (purists may cringe, but that would be missing the point) and "African Herbsman"; and in closing, the title track's endless looping invocation of the pedal steel sound underlying Hawaiian slack-guitar style. A tour-de-force.

RSS Feeds

ADVERTISING LINKS

Arc128
Quincy Jones Eagle Rock
Lawson Sideblock
Globe Trekker 120 150
emusicsideblock

GoNomad
Roland

Contact us | Press Room | Contests | About Global Rhythm magazine | Advertise / Media Kit
Privacy Statement | Terms of Use
| Global Rhythm Contributors | Link to Us | Back Issues

Copyright © 2008 Zenbu Media. All rights reserved.

Powered by Ecomsolutions.net