Greater Latin America    JOAQUÍN DÍAZ    World Music at Global Rhythm - The Destination for World Music


Greater Latin America    JOAQUÍN DÍAZ    World Music at Global Rhythm - The Destination for World Music
nancymitchell

Search

WORLD MUSIC NEWS
WorldMusicFeatures
WORLD MUSIC Profiles
  Artist Features
  World Music Legends
  Reggae Legends
  African Legends
Live Music Events
  World Music Concerts
  World Music Festivals
  World Music Clubs
Global Lifestile
  Travel
  Food
  Film
reviews
  Books
  DVD
  Live Music
WorldMusicFeatures
WORLD MUSIC CD ReVIEW
  Africa
  Asia & Far East
  Australia & Oceania
  Celtic & Irish
  Electronica
  Europe
  Greater Latin America
  Jazz
  Middle East & North Africa
  New Age & Avant Garde
  North American
  Reggae & Caribbean
  South Asia
  World Fusion
WORLD MUSIC links
back issues
 

Deutsch
Franais
Espa ol
Italiano
Portuguese
Japanese
Chinese





World Music CD Reviews Greater Latin America

Print Page
E-mail to Friend E-mail to Editor
Joaquín Díaz
Merengue Alegre
Arhoolie

By Bruce Carnevale

Based in Montreal, but originally from the Dominican Republic, accordionist and singer Joaquín Díaz plays fast. Real fast. For those familiar with merengue, this won’t surprise, but if more popular recordings—like the nice Rough Guide sampler—have colored your contact, it may. Díaz plays a stripped-down style, but “stripped down” refers to what has happened to merengue, i.e., no amplified guitars, bass or synthesizers, but rather accordion, bass, tambora, congas and güira (a scored metal cylinder rubbed with a metal stick). Díaz’s perico ripiao style clearly wears its rural roots on its sleeves. Díaz, however, doesn’t just play fast. In the speed, a peacefulness resides. While one cannot relax to this record, the quickness never tires. There’s none of the jolly galloping rhythms, but a sweaty, gutsy drive, like in “Autentico Merengue” or the title cut, expressing a pure, simple happiness. His “Bachata Sentimental” does what good merengue does, it gets your body moving. In world beat, cultural mixes lead traditions to change. This record reveals that the older forms, themselves a product of mixture, have an equal footing, even if they have become marginalized.

RSS Feeds

ADVERTISING LINKS

Gnaoua Festtival
Quincy Jones Eagle Rock
Lawson Sideblock
Globe Trekker 120 150
emusicsideblock

GoNomad
Roland

Contact us | Press Room | Contests | About Global Rhythm magazine | Advertise / Media Kit
Privacy Statement | Terms of Use
| Global Rhythm Contributors | Link to Us | Back Issues

Copyright © 2008 Zenbu Media. All rights reserved.

Powered by Ecomsolutions.net