Greater Latin America    Diego Amador    World Music at Global Rhythm - The Destination for World Music


Greater Latin America    Diego Amador    World Music at Global Rhythm - The Destination for World Music
IRIS

Search

WORLD MUSIC NEWS
WorldMusicFeatures
WORLD MUSIC Profiles
  Artist Features
  World Music Legends
  Reggae Legends
  African Legends
Live Music Events
  World Music Concerts
  World Music Festivals
  World Music Clubs
Global Lifestile
  Travel
  Food
  Film
reviews
  Books
  DVD
  Live Music
WorldMusicFeatures
WORLD MUSIC CD ReVIEW
  Africa
  Asia & Far East
  Australia & Oceania
  Celtic & Irish
  Electronica
  Europe
  Greater Latin America
  Jazz
  Middle East & North Africa
  New Age & Avant Garde
  North American
  Reggae & Caribbean
  South Asia
  World Fusion
WORLD MUSIC links
back issues
 

Deutsch
Franais
Espa ol
Italiano
Portuguese
Japanese
Chinese





World Music CD Reviews Greater Latin America

Print Page
E-mail to Friend E-mail to Editor
Diego Amador
Piano Jondo
World Village

By Michael Stone

Published January 24, 2008

The gypsy heritage of Diego Amador (known to fans as “El Churri”) permeates the singer and multi-instrumentalist’s first piano exploration of his Sevilla flamenco roots. As a drummer for Pata Negra (the flamenco-fusion project of older brothers Rafael and Raimundo), Amador was fascinated with the music of legendary flamenco singer Camarón and the guitar work of Paco De Lucia, but he was also influenced by jazz giants like Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, Weather Report, and Jaco Pastorius, whose album-closing “Continuum” receives a tango treatment with Miguel Vargas (double bass), Luis Amador (percussion, cajón) and Amador on guitar. In a seeming paradox, Amador is emphatic about maintaining the distinction between flamenco and jazz indeed, his piano approach is deeply conditioned by the unique dynamics of flamenco guitar. Recalling Chano Domínguez, the Cádiz pianist whose first instrument was also flamenco guitar, Amador’s originality is abundantly evident in these evocative interpretations of bulería, rondeña, seguiriya, soleá, tango, tanguillo, and taranta styles.

RSS Feeds

ADVERTISING LINKS

Kosmic Music
Quincy Jones Eagle Rock
Lawson Sideblock
Globe Trekker 120 150
emusicsideblock

GoNomad
sonicbids

Contact us | Press Room | Contests | About Global Rhythm magazine | Advertise / Media Kit
Privacy Statement | Terms of Use
| Global Rhythm Contributors | Link to Us | Back Issues

Copyright © 2008 Zenbu Media. All rights reserved.

Powered by Ecomsolutions.net